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What Every Company Should Learn From United Airlines
05/16/2017

By Rod Collins

The recent outrage over the violent removal of a boarded paying customer to make room for a commuting employee clearly caught United Airlines by surprise. As the facts of this troubling situation unfolded, it appears that the airline’s customer service representatives and its executives were initially convinced that the only real problem that happened during the boarding process of Flight 3411 was a passenger’s refusal to accept the airline’s re-accommodation policy. Within 24 hours of the incident, United’s CEO praised his employees in an internal memo for their adherence to company policy, reinforcing his commitment to stand behind them in their proper handling of a “belligerent” customer who refused to give up his seat in deference to corporate wishes. It appears from the memo that the CEO was certain the airline did everything right and that the passenger did everything wrong.

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How to Improve DAM User Adoption and Maximize ROI
05/09/2017

By Emily Quan

For a lot of DAM managers, the phase right after the rollout of a new or improved DAM system can be a bit nebulous. How do you measure user adoption? How do you ensure user adoption?
There’s a high chance that the DAM is competing for your users’ attention alongside other systems that have a bigger impact on the bottom line. Balancing competing priorities and adapting to new technologies can be confusing or simply frustrating for individuals, posing significant risks to user adoption. A comprehensive and analytics-driven view of asset use and value, user activity trends, and user experience (UX) improvement opportunities will be key to the program’s success. This blog outlines approaches to applying asset metadata audits and dashboard reporting, to encourage user adoption, and appropriately assess and demonstrate DAM ROI.

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Why Holacracy May Not Work For Extraverts
04/25/2017

By Rod Collins

Early in my career, I discovered I was a borderline extravert when I completed the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) as part of a management training class. The tool measures psychological preferences among four sets of dichotomies: extraversion/introversion, sensing/intuition, thinking/feeling, and judging/perceiving. While my results showed that I had very dominant preferences in three of the categories, I had only a slight preference for extraversion. I was not surprised to learn that I go back and forth when it comes to being an extravert or an introvert.

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The Future of Strategy
03/21/2017

By Rod Collins

For more than a century, Kodak was one of America’s top-rated brands. Founded in 1890, the pioneering technology company became one of the great innovators of its time, transforming the photography industry from the purview of an elite few professionals and hobbyists into a market for the masses. Through a product progression of easy-to-use, affordable cameras, Kodak made taking pictures as effortless as the push of a button. Employing a simple and effective strategy—sell inexpensive cameras and make large margins on film and film processing—the photography innovator became a consistently profitable American icon. By 1976, Kodak had corralled a remarkable 90 percent of film sales and 85 percent of camera sales.

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A Glimpse into the Future of Work
02/21/2017

By Rod Collins

While the technology revolution continues to transform daily living at a remarkable clip, we are suddenly becoming aware of possibilities that few of us could have imagined even a few years ago. Driverless cars, 3D printers, sophisticated robotics, artificial intelligence, and virtual reality are all early stage applications that seem destined to alter the world of work as we have known it. There are some futurists who portend that the current arc of technology is highly likely to rapidly eliminate many, if not most, jobs far more rapidly than any of us are prepared for. For example, as the founders of Google continue to make progress in developing driverless cars, we can envision a world where bus and taxi drivers will become as anachronistic as the long-gone elevator operators.

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The Essential Skill for Our Age
01/31/2017

By Rod Collins

There is a common problem that imbues every one of our social institutions: We underestimate the full extent of how much and how rapidly the world around us is changing. Whether you are in business or politics or education or the arts, your world has changed dramatically—if not radically—just within the past two decades. Despite the fact that most of us cognitively acknowledge that we live in a time of accelerating change, we nevertheless emotionally latch onto a familiar mindset to interpret unprecedented and unfamiliar realities. This explains why many traditional leaders believe that we are transitioning from a “Third Industrial Revolution,”—sometimes referred to as the Digital Revolution—to a “Fourth Industrial Revolution” that will be defined by the Internet of Things, robotics, nanotechnology, biotechnology, and 3D printers.

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Smart Hospitals – Part 2: Managing the Inherent Cyber Security Risk
01/17/2017

by Dimitrios Gontzes

Becoming a Smart Hospital is not a utopic state. In my previous blog, I described what a Smart Hospital is and how tangible its defining assets are. In fact, hospitals are inevitably moving in this direction – they adopt new technologies and systems to enable them to respond to the increasing customer demands, achieve greater efficiencies and better react to regulatory standards and disruptive risks. Hospitals are also expected to experience great benefits from using an interconnected network of systems and devices – increased healthcare reach (through tele-health, tele-monitoring), cost and time savings, and enhanced quality of care. Furthermore, Smart Hospitals are likely to bring improvements in the areas of patient safety, medical and surgical abilities, and customer experience.

Smart Hospitals, however, seem to carry an inherent danger – the cyber security risk.

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Smart Hospitals – Part 1: Designing the future
01/03/2017

by Dimitrios Gontzes

 

The term “smart hospital” might sound like another buzzword that businesses use, but the idea behind it is solid and, given the digital technology advances, very tangible. The introduction of Internet of Things, the development of sophisticated software and the need for more personalised care are pushing “traditional” hospitals to transform in terms of interoperability and legacy systems. The Smart mantra can be summarised in a simple question: “How do we leverage real time information to achieve clinical excellence and enhanced patient experience?” That’s essentially what Smart Hospitals are trying to answer.

In this two part blog I will first lay out what a Smart Hospital is and define the assets that form the starting point for implementation. The second part will focus on the benefits to the healthcare system, the inherit security and data protection dangers and the ways to protect organisations from them.

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Rethinking Values in the Workplace
12/20/2016

By Rod Collins

 

In a recent global survey of more than 1,700 chief executive officers, researchers at IBM found that the CEOs identified empowering employees through values as an essential driver of high performance. When we think of values, what usually comes to mind are virtues, such as integrity, honesty, fairness, and trust. These virtues are the attributes that are generally reflected in well-meaning corporate mission statements. Unfortunately, in far too many instances, these values are more “talk” than “walk.” Despite management’s best intentions, corporate mission statements rarely become corporate behavior templates. Why, if values are so important to performance, do so many organizations have trouble walking the talk? Perhaps it’s because managers are focused on the wrong values.

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Delivering System Integration on a Bigger Scale
12/13/2016

One of the biggest challenges in any sector is turning strategy into action and impact, knowing where to focus effort and in what order. Specialist commissioning in England is trying to reposition itself in the context of exponential development and innovation in precision medicine, health technology and novel therapies for rare diseases, the main focus of specialised commissioning as well as a system shift to population health risk management. Providers of specialist services are starting to respond to this challenge by designing new models of integrated care. One example is the Accountable Cancer Network involving The Christie, the Royal Marsden and University College London Hospitals. Earlier detection is a key aim of such models but even these innovators recognise the current provider networks need to be expanded, potentially beyond the health system, to do this really effectively.

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An Agile Specialist Commissioner to Deliver the 5YFV
11/29/2016

One of the biggest challenges in any sector is turning strategy into action and impact, knowing where to focus effort and in what order. Specialist commissioning in England is trying to reposition itself in the context of exponential development and innovation in precision medicine, health technology and novel therapies for rare diseases, the main focus of specialised commissioning as well as a system shift to population health risk management.

The strategy and a number of the policies currently being consulted on call for a different way of operating to be more responsive to health technology innovation. The agile specialist commissioner is the future.

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An Epoch Change: The New Rules for How the World Works
11/15/2016

by Rod Collins

We live in a new world with a radically different set of rules. This is not hyperbole. It’s a reality, albeit a reality that very few of the leadership elite want to recognize. That’s because this new reality is unpalatable to those who hang onto the traditional reigns of power, even as they find themselves increasingly powerless to hold back the acceleration of a technological Cambrian-style event that is rapidly rendering old ways obsolete.

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Digital Retail Banking Imperative
10/25/2016

by Brad Arnold

Many hours of research has been published presenting evidence that ‘omni-channel’ and ‘digital’ initiatives should be at the forefront of retail banking transformation programs.

Presenting a seamless client experience across channels and enabling banks to interact with customers through progressive digital means offers revenue growth and cost reduction opportunities.  These include cross-selling products, new fee-based budgetary services, resale of non-banking products, marketing technology system consolidation, de-duplication of promotional strategies, and digital asset reuse to name a few.  But how do banks get there?

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Possible Advantages of Developing a Risk-based Approach to Border Management
10/03/2016

by Dr. Marco Stefan, Aurélie Heetman, Quentin Liger, Mirja Gutheil and Jacque Mallender

What are the solutions developed by the U.S. to curb irregular migration? How can new technologies and data analytics improve strategic decisions in the field of border control? How can the U.S. experience of implementing strategic shifts in border management inform the decision-making process in the European context? How can it be tailored to address the challenges currently posed by the migrant crisis in the EU?

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An Agile Dilemma: Mindset or Method?
09/13/2016

by Rod Collins

There’s an intriguing dialogue happening in the world of Agile software development that may be relevant for anyone interested in how business works in a rapidly changing world. For those readers who are not familiar with Agile, this innovative approach to creating software emerged out of a February 2001 gathering of seventeen software developers in Snowbird, Utah. Among them were Jeff Sutherland and Ken Schwaber, the coauthors of what has come to be known as Scrum, and Ward Cunningham, the originator of the wiki, which became popularized with the explosive growth of Wikipedia. These software experts were frustrated with the cumbersome practices of traditional top-down management and set about to devise a better way to do their work. The result of their efforts was the crafting of the one-page Agile Manifesto, which is a set of four fundamental values that provide the foundation for a faster and more effective way to write software:

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Risky Business: Brexit’s Impact on Cybersecurity and Data Protection
08/29/2016

by James Eager

Since 23 June 2016, many words have been dedicated to Brexit’s potential impacts on all things cybersecurity and data protection. Now that the dust has settled, cybersecurity and data protection experts have converged upon a selection of key risks through what appears to be a natural implementation of the Delphi method*. With added value provided by Optimity’s talented subject matter experts, this blog provides an essential guide to the implications of Brexit for the UK’s approach to cybersecurity and data protection, as well as for UK-based businesses.

Uncertainty reigns supreme

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How The Best Company To Work For Works
08/17/2016

by Rod Collins

Each March, Fortune magazine publishes its annual list of the Best Companies to Work For. The list is based upon an extensive survey of a random group of employees from each of the applicant companies. The responses are converted into company scores that aggregate employees’ attitudes about management’s credibility, overall job satisfaction, and camaraderie as well as assessments of the quality of hiring practices, internal communication, training, and recognition programs. This past March, for the seventh time in the last ten years, Google (disclosure: the author is invested long) ranked #1 on the prestigious list.

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DAM's Next Wave Anticipates Our Connected Future
08/02/2016

by John Horodyski

Everywhere we look, change is permeating businesses: the people, the processes and the technology. 

A common concern I heard at three recent content conferences was how to manage these changes and anticipate their effects.

But have we become so involved in the details that we failed to see the bigger picture of what’s coming our way? Have we become too focused on discrete technology advances without considering their effects on operating models? Have our processes become so complicated that we are incapable to nimbly respond? 

Digital asset management (DAM) is not immune to these changes. And while the future looks bright for DAM, we need to broaden our vision of DAM beyond just managing digital assets to viewing it as a critical component of the information ecosystem.

DAM's First Wave

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Are You Ready for the Second Wave of the Digital Revolution?
07/26/2016

by Rod Collins

There are few business leaders who would disagree that we are living in a time of great change. In the brief sixteen years since the new millennium began, we have experienced more change than we saw in the last five decades of the previous century. Perhaps the author Tom Friedman captured this phenomenon best when he recently quipped, “In 2004, Facebook didn’t exist, 4G was a parking space, an app was something you sent off to college, LinkedIn was a prison, Tweet was a sound a bird made, and Skype was a typo.” None of these things existed a mere twelve years ago, and yet, each of these innovations is now a staple of our day-to-day lives.

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